More videos with the artists nominated for PIPA Prize 2017

As PIPA Online gets closer – the voting’s first round starts in three weeks, in July 16th – more interviews with PIPA Prize 2017 nominees are published. Discover, through this series of exclusive interviews produced by Do Rio Filmes, the works of Jorge Luiz Fonseca, Mara de Carli, Marina Camargo, Mario Bands and Pedro França.

Jorge Luiz Fonseca

“Of course I could talk about the materials and techniques I use to shape my work. But I’d rather talk about the essentials. About my gaze.” It is with that line that Jorge Luiz Fonseca, a PIPA Prize nominee for the first time this year, starts his video-interview. A woodworker turned train conductor turned artist, his work proposes an intense dialogue with Brazilian popular art.

See Jorge Luiz Fonseca’s page to learn more about his career, view images of his works and read critical texts. 

Mara de Carli

Specialized in woodcut, Mara de Carli doesn’t have a daily relationship with her studio. She does admit to plan her next works in her head obsessively, however. “In my process, I have a time for planning and a time for waiting,” she states. “More than a physical space, my studio is located in my head.”

See Mara de Carli’s page to learn more about her career, view images of his works and read critical texts. 

Marina Camargo

Geographical displacement marks the work of Marina Camargo, nominated for PIPA Prize for the second time this year. Researching the landscape in its various manifestations (through images, memories, travel narratives, cartographies), the artist states at all times the impossibility to represent places as a whole, be it the Equatorial Line, such as in “Gravidade na Linha do Equador” (“Gravity in the Ecuatorian line”), from 2015, or de German alpes, as in “Beckton Alps – all that falls” (2017)

See Marina Camargo’s page to learn more about her career, view images of his works and read critical texts. 

Mario Bands

A PIPA Prize nominee for the first time this year, Mario Bands’ artistic path started in the streets. His works, which mix 3D-like geometric shapes and the bright colors typical of street art, can be seen in a number of walls in Rio de Janeiro. His philosophy too comes from the street: for the artist, who lives in one of the biggest favelas of Rio, Complexo da Penha, to make art is to “bring some color, joy, and at the very least encourage some kind of reflection” to passers-by.

See Mario Bands’ page to learn more about his career, view images of his works and read critical texts. 

Pedro França

Nominated for PIPA Prize for the first time last year, Pedro França works between the boundaries of visual arts and theater. Member of the theatrical company Ueinzz, it is not rare for his oeuvre to take part in the costume and backdrops of the plays he presents. Still, he prefers not to work in terms of projects per se. “My work is more of a collection of things I did, individually or collectively, here or anywhere else, which I later condense into something worth displaying,” summarizes the artist.

See Pedro França’s page to learn more about his career, view images of his works and read critical texts. 

Besides them, another 22 video-interviews with PIPA Prize 2017 nominees have been published. Watch them here.



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