PIPA 2014 nominee interview: Marcelo Jácome

Marcelo Jácome is asked by critic and curator Renata Azambuja: “Do you work alone or collectively?”

He replies: “When I’m thinking about work, it takes place in a more lonely way, by myself. When my work comes out to the world and it is shown, I think it requires a collective setting perhaps, so it can become effective and be assembled.”

The artist speaks of the material research, papers, collages and colors and resulted in the works he does with kites: “Kites came in more as a plastic solution for what I wished than effectively as a poetic element or whatever” and says that on his everyday life, if he is not at his studio he is out walking.

Watch the video:

For more information, biography, exhibition history and images of artworks, access Marcelo Jácome‘s page.

PIPA Videos

Since PIPA’s first edition in 2010, we hire Matrioska Filmes to carry out video-interviews with the nominated artists. Coming now to its fifth edition, the Prize goes on with believing in the importance of video that are yearly produced by Matrioska, exclusively for PIPA.
For more PIPA videos, access our videos page.

As MAM-Rio curator and Prize counselor Luis Camillo Osorio points out, in the text “Hunger for files”: If the prize aims to recognize and distinguish, the building of a contemporary memory looked for an amplified analysis of the circuit.

Laura Vinci | PIPA 2014 nominated artist interview

In this interview artist Laura Vinci, nominated for PIPA 2014, answers a question by critic and curator Renata Azambuja: “Do you work alone or collectively?”

The artist explains her process involves both things. “I work alone and collectively. I work in a studio, which is quite lonely. I don’t sharing with other people, I like being alone, it is a moment when I can concentrate and organize ideas. Then my work becomes totally collective, because I depend on other people from different fields, sometimes an engineer, a welder, a carrier…”

Vinci, who also works with stage design and art direction for theatre, tells us how her work “Palavras Congeladas” [Frozen Words] was built, and that she always carries on her a notebook to write down ideas that, if persist, can become a work.

Watch the video:

For further information and images of her artworks, access the Laura Vinci‘s page.

PIPA Videos

Since PIPA’s first edition in 2010, we hire Matrioska Filmes to carry out video-interviews with the nominated artists. Coming now to its fifth edition , the Prize goes on with believing in the importance of video that are yearly produced by Matrioska, exclusively for PIPA.
For more PIPA videos, access our videos page.

As MAM-Rio curator and Prize counselor Luis Camillo Osorio points out, in the text “Hunger for files”: If the prize aims to recognize and distinguish, the building of a contemporary memory looked for an amplified analysis of the circuit.

Read below the full text by Luiz Camillo Osorio, who talks about the importance of memory, archive, registration of facts, and how the PIPA videos have these goals.

Hunger for files

You watch the documentary that Scorcese made about Dylan and is astonished to see how Americans documented every interview given by the then promising folk singer. We can stop right here and say that Dylan and the United States deserve each other. Nothing in the history of Brazil has made us to have an attitude of high expectations on ourselves that lead us to register what emerges.
- Caetano Veloso

Reading this passage written in his column at O Globo newspaper on October 7th, 2012, I couldn’t not agree more with Caetano. In fact, there is a enormous negligence regarding to memory, to file, the record of events. Our passion for the ephemeral, our continuous promise of a future, ends to disregard the register of facts and the need to give them some posterity.

A recent example for opening the discussion. Marta Mestre, a Portuguese curator and assistant curator of MAM-Rio, wanted to make an exhibition with the history of Espaço Sergio Porto, in Rio. Between the late 1980′s and the middle of the next decade, that small gallery in Humaitá launched a whole generation of artists that today is internationally acclaimed. Despite the relevance of that space for the city, there was no file or record of the facts available. The solution was to go to what was saved by the artists to move the project forward. The disregard for the public access to memory is a dangerous pathology that strengthens privileges and reinforces asymmetries. 

On the other hand, with the recent development of new technologies and the ease of photographing or filming every and any happening with a small cellphone, there is a real hunger for playback. Before the experience, the existential bond, the affection, already comes the record. The equation is inverted, but if there isn’t a way to select and keep the registering, the problem stays the same.

We must combine matter and memory and build archives that bring a bet on the differentiated recordings of the present. Fortunately, some initiatives begin to appear in Brazil – better late than never – in the sense of creating, retrieving and working with archives. The Prêmio Investidor Profissional de Arte – PIPA – bets in that direction by conducting small interviews via Skype with all the Prize’s nominees.  These interviews seek to hear them briefly talking about their works, their creative processes, work environment, questions and demands. These videos are available at PIPA website alongside the page of every nominated artist. The idea is that they can be updated from new nominations of artists to the Prize, but always having as a priority the first time nominees.

Setting the view on the present, they might seem as a mere occasional and superficial record. However, our effort is to go beyond the concentrated and focused look of the art market that repeats names to inflate values. The open and descentralized record widens the angle of attention recording the diversity of the local scene. Between the closed market and the indifference of non-criterion, interviews and pages of PIPA nominees are a panoramic portrait of Brazilian contemporary art.

In these three years, 195 interviews have been done with 159 different artists, living in cities as distinct as Riachão do Jacuípe in Bahia, Belém and Piraquara in Pará, Berlin, Stockholm, and, of course, Rio, São Paulo and in major Brazilian capitals. The many micro-scenes that compose the Brazilian contemporary scene can be viewed and evaluated, revealing differences and convergences. To what extent are all these artists contemporary? Which Brazil – plural – speaks through its creative questions? How do they share common poetic horizons?

When PIPA invited Matrioska film production to make these videos, its goal was to build a small database on Brazilian contemporary art. If the prize aims to recognize and distinguish, the building of a contemporary memory looked for an amplified analysis of the circuit.

Naturally, the artists that live on the outskirts are the most interested in making the videos. If they don’t have a computer with a camera, they figure out some way to have the possibility of presenting themselves for the bigger circuit.

We are sure that the continuity of these records and their combination with the renewal of the artists’ pages – that has to be made in partnership with the artists and their respective galleries – will maximize the relevance of this database. A growing number of interested people, from researchers to collectors, have began using the PIPA website for the benefit of all. It is common for us to get emails by researchers, national and international (the site is bilingual, Portuguese/English), who used the website and are thanking us for making everything available on the web.

It will be with the construction of archives and a critical Brazilian art memory that our circuit will be able to answer, without running over itself, by the growing euphoria of the international markets, whose interests, its most legitimate interests, are myopic and don’t value the intensive time necessary for the construction of poetics with the density proper to them. Archives, all of them, need filters, criteria, conflicts and, above all, heterogeneous temporality, non-synchronic and non-immediate. PIPA tries to do its part.

How to vote on PIPA Online 2014

PIPA Online 2014:

PIPA Online is the award category open to all PIPA 2014 nominees. This year there are two categories in PIPA Online:

  • PIPA Online – The winner is selected by a Jury among the five most voted artists on the 2nd round of PIPA Online voting. He receives R$10,000 plus a two month artist residency program at Sacatar Foundation, at Itaparica, Bahia, Brazil.
  • PIPA Popular Vote Online -The winner is the most voted artist on the 2nd round of PIPA Online voting and receives R$5,000.

PIPA Online voting happens in two rounds:

1st round – open to all nominees (who have agreed to take part in the voting) – from 20 to 27 July

2nd round – only the artists who have received more than 500 votes in the 1st round- from 03 to 10 August

Learn how to vote on your favorite artists for PIPA Online 2014.

Watch the tutorial video, or follow the step by step instructions, below:

Step by step to vote on PIPA Online 2014
1st step: To vote you must have a profile on Facebook.
If you don’t have a profile on Facebook but want to vote, you need to go to www.facebook.com.br and sign up following the instructions.
If you already have a Facebook account move to the 2nd step.

2nd step: Click on “Vote on PIPA Online”, option located on the site’s menu bar ( on the top of left site), to go to the list with the artists who are participating on the PIPA Online 2014 context;

3rd step: Click on the name of the artist who you want to vote for, the link will take you to the artist’s page;

4th step: Click the “vote” button on the vote box, next to a kite, on the right side of the page.

That’s all, you have already voted!

To vote on other artists you just have to repeat the step by step instructions above. If you already know the name of the artist you want to vote for, simply go to his (her) profile page.

IMPORTANT:

If you are not logged on Facebook while voting, a small window will open asking for your username and password. Just fill in to vote.
If you are voting for the first time, two other small windows will open, asking for your permission to accept the application of voting. Just accept to vote.
As we use the Facebook tool, it is not allowed for the same person/profile to “vote” each artist more than once. Clicking again on the “vote” button of same artist’s page (as also clicking on the same artist’s page on www.pipa.org.br) you will cancel the vote.
We use this social networking tool to ensure the security of the vote. You can vote for as many artists you want, but one at a time.

PIPA will not have access to your information at Facebook.

To know more details and rules about PIPA Online 2014 click here.

PIPA 2014 | Interview with nominee Ivan Grilo

Ivan Grilo tells us how he has been reconsidering his relationship to photography and answers to the question proposed by critic and curator Alejandra Muñoz: “In general, in your activity, how does a new art project start?”

Grilo explains that a process ends up being closely connected to another and that the great pleasure in his line of work is to see that connection.

As an example, the artist tells us that last year he was elaborating an artwork that was connected to fog and dimming things. “I was kind of obsessed with this fog thing, and I ended up discovering that there is a story of a king in Portugal who disapperared in the fog, king Sebastian.”

While researching about it, Grilo found out the king supposedly ended up in an island in Maranhão, which led the artist to this island to deepen his research about the story. The full report on this experience can be read in lucianacaravello.com.br/exposicoes/sentimo-nos-cegos/ (in Portuguese).

Watch the video:

PIPA Videos

Since PIPA’s first edition in 2010, we hire Matrioska Filmes to carry out video-interviews with the nominated artists. Coming now to its fifth edition, the Prize goes on with believing in the importance of video that are yearly produced by Matrioska, exclusively for PIPA.

For more videos made exclusively for the Prize since 2010, access our videos page.

For more information on Ivan Grilo, images of his artworks and his bio, access his artist page.

PIPA Online 2014 | Starts this Sunday with news

PIPA Online 2014:

- Open to all nominees
- Voting on the artists’ pages at www.pipa.org.br or www.pipaprize.com
- Two categories: PIPA Online and PIPA Popular Vote Online
- Awards: PIPA Online – winner receives R$10,000 plus a two month artist residency program at Sacatar Foundation, at Itaparica, Bahia, Brazil.
PIPA Popular Vote Online - winner receives R$5,000
- Winners: PIPA Online – selected by a Jury among the five most voted artists on the 2nd round of PIPA Online voting
PIPA Popular Vote Online - the most voted artist on the 2nd round of PIPA Online voting
- 1st round – open to all nominees – from 20 to 27 July
– 2nd round – to move to the 2nd round is required at least 500 votes – from 03 to 10 August

See below full details

About the awards

PIPA goals remains since its creation, the main one being to value and promote artists and the contemporary Brazilian art. For this, we direct most of our annual budget through the awards ​​given to artists, production of exclusive videos with artists, in the preparation and distribution of catalog and maintenance of the websites.

Since the first year, the Prize has three award categories. In two only the four finalists may run: PIPA and PIPA Popular Vote Exhibition. In PIPA award, the winner is the one chosen by the Award Jury and the artist receives a total of R$100,000, including participation in an international artist residency program. PIPA Popular Vote Exhibition’s winner is elected, by the audience who visit the finalists’ exhibition at Museum of Modern Art of Rio de Janeiro (MAM-Rio), who receives an additional R$10,000 addition to the R$10,000 donated to each of the four finalists.

The third award category is the PIPA Online, open to all nominees. PIPA Online was created during the first edition of the Prize in 2010, with the main purpose of increasing the highlight of all nominees, expanding the focus beyond the finalists.

Recently we were contacted by Sacatar Foundation which proposed a partnership with PIPA. The Foundation runs a residency program, open to artists of all nationalities, in Itaparica, an island in the metropolitan region of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Sacatar Foundation is well recognized by different sources.

In pursuit of a constant improvement of the Award, we decided to take this opportunity to make the online version even more relevant and qualified, splitting PIPA Online into two categories: PIPA Online and  PIPA Popular Vote Online. Just as the finalists compete for two prizes – one with the popular vote which is decided by the audience and the other by a Jury, in which the prize includes an artist residency – the same will happen now with all nominees.

● 20 July – First round of PIPA Online begins
● 27 July – End of PIPA Online first round
● 03 August – Second round of PIPA Online begins
● 10 August – End of PIPA Online second round
● 11 August – Announcement of PIPA Popular Vote Online winner
● 22 August – Announcement of PIPA  Online winner

 

RULES FOR THE ONLINE AWARDS 2014: PIPA ONLINE AND PIPA POPULAR VOTE ONLINE

• All nominees in this edition will be invited to participate;
• Participation is not mandatory;
• Voting will be online, at the pages of the artists in the PIPA (pipa.org.br and pipaprize.com) websites;
• The vote will take two rounds;
• Will move to the second round only the artists who obtain at least 500 votes;
• The count is reset at the end of the first round, and starts from zero in the second round;
• Among the 5 top rated artists in the second round (including therefore the winner of PIPA Popular Vote Online), one will be chosen by a jury and declared winner of PIPA Online;
• The PIPA Online winner will receive R$10,000 in addition to the fund for two months in the Sacatar program residency (in 2015 at a date yet to be determined) and will donate a work to the IP Institute (to be decided by mutual agreement between the artist and the coordination of the IP Institute);
• The Jury will be composed by Lucrecia Vinhaes (coordinator and a board member of PIPA and IP Institute), Luiz Camillo Osorio (MAM-Rio’s curator and PIPA board member) and a representative of Sacatar Foundation;
The Jury will make its decision based on the votes received online, on the artist’s trajectory and on the quality of data and information at the artist’s profile page at PIPA’s websites;
• Participation in the residency program Sacatar and the cash donation may not be disrupted if the winner does not want it, or is prevented from participating in residence, he will forfeit the prize and a new winner will be defined by the Jury.
• The most voted artist in the second round will be declared the winner of PIPA Popular Vote Online, and will receive R$5,000 and will donate a work to the IP Institute (to be decided by mutual agreement between the artist and the coordination of the IP Institute);

PIPA’s websites

Currently much of the efforts of the PIPA team are focused on maintaining and enhancing the websites of the Prize. The positive results of this work appear in the multiplication of the number of hits (monthly the websites receive visits from over 100 different countries), and from the feedback of researchers, dealers, collectors and journalists, from Brazil and abroad, whom use our websites as main sources of research and reference on Brazilian contemporary art.

By creating this new Online award category, we aim to encourage the artists to use PIPA websites as fundamental to disseminate their work through this platform, since one of the guidelines to select PIPA Online’s winner is to review the pages of artists on PIPA’s websites.

Artists who wish to make changes in their pages should submit data to the PIPA coordination via email ( premiopipa@gmail.com ). Videos, pictures and texts in English and Portuguese can be included. Changes will be made ​​as soon as possible, respecting the order in which the datas are received.

Keeping in mind that part of the purpose of the sites is the creation of a relevant file on Brazilian contemporary art, presenting complete and meaningful material about the history of the career of each artist. For this reason we have reservations about what may or may not be excluded from the sites. The insertion of new material is welcome and can be requested at any time, no matter if the artist is or is not participating in the current edition of the Prize.

Fábia Schnoor | Exclusive PIPA 2014 nominated artist video-interview

Fábia Schnoor is graduated in visual arts, pottery, arts education and design, and this is the first time she has been nominated for PIPA.

In this interview she answers a question proposed by critic and curator Alejandra Muñoz on how does she choose the predominant themes in her work, explaining that often this choice is made through everyday life facts that stimulate her, and in other times she goes after these themes.

The artist says she works a lot with matters of chance and also tells us how it is to work with nankin and comments on the series “Bookworks, dots and lines”.

Fábia speaks of how she enjoys being completely free in her work. “I like to get dirty and have the freedom to occupy this space. I need to put it back in place, in order to start again.”

Watch the video:

PIPA Videos

Since PIPA’s first edition in 2010, we hire Matrioska Filmes to carry out video-interviews with the nominated artists. Coming now to its fifth edition , the Prize goes on with believing in the importance of video that are yearly produced by Matrioska, exclusively for PIPA.

For more videos made exclusively for the Prize since 2010, access our videos page.

For more information on Fábia Schnoor, images of her artworks and her bio, access her artist page.

Watch the third and last interview with Cadu, about his experience at Residency Unlimited, NYC

As part of the prize for winning PIPA 2013, Cadu has spent a three-month artistic residency period at Residency Unlimited, which we followed through two interviews made through Skype.

In the first video, the artist spoke of the feeling of returning to New York after fourteen years, and how he deals with the fast pace of the city that never sleeps.

In the second interview, Cadu told us that about 18 to 25 artists partcipated in the residency programme at the same time, enabling daily meetings of people from different parts of the world.

Now, returning recently from the United States, the artist gives us his last interview of the three video series, in which he reports on the experience he had at Residency Unlimited. In it, Cadu speaks of the exchange with artists of multiple nationalities that the residency period enabled and the projeto “Wind Line”, which he created and that led to an exhibition in New York.

The artist, now preparing for a trip through the Atacama desert, says he still has not been able to analyse what happened in New York and already he must prepare for a new trip. without having the time to carry out a silencing process as he would want to before going on another experience. “But then I remember a sentence by Bukowski, you will create no matter what, whether there is a cat meowing, a crying child or a leaking pipe. You have got to do things the way you can, not the way you want.”

Watch the video:

Access Cadu’s page for images of his works, further information on his career and other exclusive videos.

During his stay at RU, Cadu also participated in a talk about his oeuvre in the past ten years with independent curator Regine Basha. For more on this event, called “Inside Out”, click here.

See some photos from “Inside Out”:

Watch the other two interviews from the series made with Cadu during his stay at RU:

First interview, May 2014:

Second interview, June 2014:

All PIPA videos are produced by Matrioska Filmes, exclusively.

Le Monde highlights Berna Reale in a exhibition in Portugal

This week, the French newspaper’s blog Le Monde published an article about the exhibition “Artists Engaged? Maybe,” the contemporary culture program “Next Future” at Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation of Portugal.

Amongst other artists the newspaper highlights Berna Reale.

To view the full story click here.

Below free translations of article’s excerpts:

The Gulbenkian Foundation, leading actor of Lisbon’s art scene has many facets, beyond its classical art, oriental or decorative collections. One of them is the “Próximo Futuro” ["Next Future"] program, which focuses on contemporary art from Africa and Latin America (and Europe), with as lectures, performances, films. The current exhibition (until September 7) has a misleading title: “Artistas Comprometidos? Talvez?” ["Committed artists? Maybe"]. It is expected a rather political and social thought, and a questioning of the distancing of the artist in relation to its commitment. Without doubt this is a problem present in some works, but more difficult to identify in others, or more second degree: as said Curator Antônio Pinto Ribeiro, politics should not be the sponsor, but the subject. This is probably what dictated my favorites, among the pieces presented, and especially the videos.

More committed, more brutal are filmed performances of the Brazilian artist Berna Reale (which is also a criminal expert), who speak of power, violence, and victims. In “Ordinario”, she collects human remains of missing persons and transports them into a wagon tray (such as those on which the dead were carried along on the battlefield) through the potholed streets of the Brazilian city of Belém do Pará, all dressed in black, tragic death angel. In “Palomo”, riding a red horse, dressing a policeman uniform completed with a visor / muzzle, she patrols the downtown streets, and “Soledade”, wearing a chic suit, Berna Reale leads a chariot of pigs in the streets of a neighborhood famous for its drug market. These rituals seemingly conjure up an absurd irony of chaos, a tragic poetry of violence. A name to remember.


 

For more information about the exhibition “Engaged Artists? Maybe”  click here.

Video interviews released this week | Daniel de Paula and Cristián Silva-Avária

This week we disclosed two video interviews with PIPA 2014 nominees:

Daniel de Paula

Daniel de Paula says he once wanted to be a football player and even studied in the US with an athlete scholarship. In his video, he speaks of some of his recent works with which he tries to activate a discussion on public materials, like lampposts for instance.

The artist shows a bit of his work environment, which he shares with other artists, and answers to a question by curator and Nominating Committee member, Daniela Labra: “What is the main shortage you observe in the field of Brazilian contemporary art?”.

In reply, Daniel says: “I feel that there are a lot of works, artists and thoughts out there that are outside this market (…) that cause great impact but are left out of certain framings and attempts at cataloguing Brazilian contemporary art at the moment.”

He also says he believes the interest in such framings are related to collections, galleries, and that can be complicated. Daniel himself proposes a question: “How does the market validate what art is?”

Watch the video:

Cristián Silva-Avaria

A Chilean living in Rio since 2011, Silva-Avaria says he works in a very solitary way, always using video and photography as tools.

The artist answers to a question by collector and Nominating Committee member Fersen Lambranho: “How was your work influenced by the street demonstrations that began in June 2013 and are still going on?”.

In reply, Silva-Avaria speaks of one of his series called “Reverso” in which he works with consumer goods, “products of uneven urban planning policies or advertising strategies that foster consumerism” and affirms: “The population manifests itself because they want things to change, and this has much to do with art. When these situations happen, you understand art has a function, that art is alive. Art for me is an act of resistance, and its function is to show society its blind spots.”

Watch the video:

Exclusive video-interview with PIPA 2014 finalist Daniel Steegmann Mangrané

Continuing our PIPA 2014 nominated artists interviews, today we disclose a conversation with finalist Daniel Steegmann Mangrané.
Born in Barcelona, the artist tells us that when he arrived in Brazil he did not know the language and had to learn how to explain the most complex things about his work with simpler words from his limited vocabulary.
“Somehow you are not illiterate, but you turn into a kind of very soft clay that is easy to be changed and modified.”

Daniel says his practice as an artist has changed greatly in the past years, mostly after he started making films and stopped working alone, and tells us that working and speaking to people from different areas has been even more enriching than working with other artists: “When working with other people, such as engineers, philosophers or scientists, you experience forms and practices with a different look.”

Watch the video:

PIPA Videos

Since PIPA’s first edition in 2010, we hire Matrioska Filmes to carry out video-interviews with the nominated artists. Coming now to its fifth edition , the Prize goes on with believing in the importance of video that are yearly produced by Matrioska, exclusively for PIPA.

For more videos made exclusively for the Prize since 2010, access our videos page.

For more information on Daniel Steegmann Mangrané, images of his artworks and his bio, access his artist page.