Ana Elisa Egreja

São Paulo, SP, 1983.
Lives and works in São Paulo, Brazil.

Represented by Galeria Leme.

PIPA Prize 2018 nominee.

Ana Elisa Egreja actively researches representation in painting. Marked by the complex composition and the meticulous reproduction of materials and textures, her canvases materialize fantastic scenes in which the ideas of domesticity and abandonment, the architectural presence and the classic genres of art history, such as still life and interior painting, are some of the cornerstones of her research. In her most recent series “Jacarezinho 92”, she portrays staged installations in the modernist house where her grandparents lived, and which, empty, served her as a studio for ten years. The work originates in the conviviality with the memories stored in the architecture of the house, the traces of familiar presences and the silence of the abandoned interiors. The processes underlying the series lead to the idea of staging to new levels, involving an effort of production and assembly that refers, by complexity, to the cinematographic procedure. She graduated in Fine Arts from the Armando Álvares Penteado Foundation and was awarded at the 15th Salão de Arte Contemporânea de Ribeirão Preto (SP, 2007), 15th Bahia Salon (MAM-BA, Salvador, 2008). Among the most recent exhibitions are “Arte Atual/Da Banalidade: vol.1”, curated by Paulo Myada, Tomie Ohtake Institute, São Paulo, Brazil (2016); 20th Festival of Contemporary Art SescVideobrasil (2017) and “Through the Looking Glass” (2017), Palazzo Capris, Turin, Italy. Her works integrate the Santander Collection, Brazil, Franks-Suss Collection (London) and the collections of the Museum of Modern Art of Bahia, Rio Art Museum and of the Pinacoteca of the State of São Paulo.

Video produced by Do Rio Filmes exclusively for PIPA Prize 2018:



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