PIPA 2014 Finalists | Watch the announcement

Every year the four Finalists are selected by PIPA Board, among the artists nominated by the Nominating Committee, of each edition.

The four finalists will participate in PIPA 2014 exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art of Rio de Janeiro, from September 6th through November 16th.

The four finalists are the only ones running for PIPA – an award of R$100,000, in which the winner will be decided by the Award Jury – and for PIPA Popular Vote Exhibition – an award of R$20,000, in which the winner is elected by the audience at PIPA’s exhibition at MAM-Rio.

Part of the R$100,00 of PIPA award will be used to fund the winner’s participation in an international artist residency program.

From 2010 to 2012 the winners went to Gasworks in London, institution with which we had a fruitful partnership.

This time, like last year PIPA 2014 winner will attend a residency program, of three months in 2015, at Residency Unlimited, in New York.

Cadu, PIPA 2013 winner is at RU at the moment, taking the advantage of this time to produce a different work, to meet curators and art dealers, visit exhibitions, exchange with other artists and all that RU and New York have to offer him.

The Finalists may also run for PIPA Online, category in which all Nominated Artists are invited to participate. The voting happens online ( here at the website), in two rounds, with the first round starting on July 20th.

Watch the video in which Luiz Camillo Osorio – Chief Curator of the Museum of Modern Art of Rio de Janeiro and PIPA Board’s Member – announces the names of PIPA 2014 Finalists.

For more information about the four finalists ( works, resumés and video-interviews) go to PIPA 2014 Finalists’ Page.

Gasworks residence artist Pedro Lagoa presents performance ritual

(London, United Kingdom)

Artist-in-residence Pedro Lagoa presents an event taking place as part of the London Branch of his ongoing project Archive of Destruction: “Cult of Rammellzee Performance Ritual: Feral Expressways Cleanse the Oval”.
 

 
“The Cult Of Rammellzee” present a performance ritual with musical collaborators Badfood and Zigteks providing the soundclash. Beginning with an audio-visual performance by artist Chooc Ly Tan, a futuristic architectural model of the Vauxhall/Oval areas surrounding Gasworks will be built and then bulldozed by sub-cult Feral Expressways in a regeneration ritual, followed by a ‘clean up’ performance by The Dysonic Hoover Boyz.

“Cult of Rammellzee Performance Ritual: Feral Expressways Cleanse the Oval”
Thursday the 22nd, 7pm
Gasworks gallery place
Free, no booking required

Gasworks
155 Vauxhall Street
London SE11 5RH

Lecture-performance by Maryam Jafri as part of solo show “Mouthfeel”

(London, United Kingdom)

Tonight at 7pm Maryam Jafri will present a new lecture-performance stemming from her research on international forms of television advertising. Jafri is joined by Liz Moor, Senior Lecturer in Media and Communications at Goldsmiths, University of London who will discuss her research on the emergence of the branding industry. This event is part of Maryam’s solo exhibition “Mouthfeel”, which goes on until 18th May.

During her lecture-performance, Maryam Jafri will situate a selection of television commercials from the global south in specific social and historical contexts. These include: the 19th century rise of domestic science as scientific discipline made by and for women; the subsequent transmutation of this field during the early 20th century into the more circumscribed domain of home economics; the 21st century phenomenon of so called “tropical tech”, which refers to investments made by global IT companies into technology incubation laboratories in sub-Saharan Africa; and the surprising, sometimes counter-intuitive connections made between war and advertising in commercials from Vietnam and Iraq.

“Mouthfeel” is the first solo exhibition in London by Maryam Jafri. Comprising the newly commissioned short film of the same name and a new photo-text work entitled ”Product Recall: An Index of Innovation” (both 2014), the exhibition explores the politics underpinning the industrial production of food, connecting themes as diverse as “big food”, flavour enhancement technology and overconsumption. 

Lecture-Performance and Presentation: Maryam Jafri on TV Advertising and Liz Moor on Branding
13th May, at 7pm
Free – book via booking@gasworks.org.uk

Gasworks
155 Vauxhall Street
London SE11 5RH
Tel: +44 (0)20 7587 5202

Lecture-performance by Maryam Jafri as part of solo show “Mouthfeel”

(London, United Kingdom)

Maryam Jafri will present a new lecture-performance stemming from her research on international forms of television advertising. Jafri is joined by Liz Moor, Senior Lecturer in Media and Communications at Goldsmiths, University of London who will discuss her research on the emergence of the branding industry. This event is part of Maryam’s solo exhibition “Mouthfeel”, which goes on until 18th May.

During her lecture-performance, Maryam Jafri will situate a selection of television commercials from the global south in specific social and historical contexts. These include: the 19th century rise of domestic science as scientific discipline made by and for women; the subsequent transmutation of this field during the early 20th century into the more circumscribed domain of home economics; the 21st century phenomenon of so called “tropical tech”, which refers to investments made by global IT companies into technology incubation laboratories in sub-Saharan Africa; and the surprising, sometimes counter-intuitive connections made between war and advertising in commercials from Vietnam and Iraq.

“Mouthfeel” is the first solo exhibition in London by Maryam Jafri. Comprising the newly commissioned short film of the same name and a new photo-text work entitled ”Product Recall: An Index of Innovation” (both 2014), the exhibition explores the politics underpinning the industrial production of food, connecting themes as diverse as “big food”, flavour enhancement technology and overconsumption. 

Lecture-Performance and Presentation: Maryam Jafri on TV Advertising and Liz Moor on Branding
13th May, at 7pm
Free – book via booking@gasworks.org.uk

Gasworks
155 Vauxhall Street
London SE11 5RH
Tel: +44 (0)20 7587 5202

In Conversations: Regina José Galindo & Emiliano Valdés at Gasworks

(London, UK)

Regina José Galindo, an artist specialising in performance art, discusses her practice with Emiliano Valdés, associate curator of the 10th Gwangiu Bienniale, and Co-director of Proyectos Ultravioleta, a multifaceted space for experimentation in contemporary art in Guatemala City.

This event coincides with the opening of A Chronicle of Interventions at Tate Modern, Project Space (2 May – 13 July 2014). A Chronicle of Interventions presents a response to the history of economic, political, military and foreign interventions in Central America. Beginning with an archival installation of Group Material’s 1984 work Timeline: A Chronicle of US Intervention in Central and Latin America, the exhibition gathers work by seven contemporary artists who explore the ramifications of these historical interventions that have shaped the contemporary reality of this region.

Regina José Galindo is a visual artist specialising in performance art. Her work explores the universal ethical implications of social injustice, discrimination related to race, gender and other abuses involved in the unequal power relations that operate in our current society. 


In Conversations: Regina José Galindo & Emiliano Valdés
30th April at 6:30pm
Free admission

Gasworks
155 Vauxhall Street
London SE11 5RH
info@gasworks.org.uk
Tel: +44 (0)20 7587 5202
Fax: +44 (0)20 7582 0159

Watch the video “Home is where the Art is: Stories about Artistic Residencies”

Watch the release of another PIPA special video, part of a series created to stimulate and contribute to discussions and reflections on art.

In “Home is where the Art is: Stories about Artistic Residencies”, pieces of statements collected between 2010 and 2013 address artistic residency. Artists tell how their experiences with residency programmes influenced their thinking and working processes. Catalina Lozano – Gasworks coordinator in 2010 – gives a perspective from the other side of the story, of what she believes a residency should be for an artist. Tatiana Blass describes through Skype, directly from London, the period she participated in Gasworks’ programme.

Watch the video:

Still on artistic residencies, a conversation between Luiz Camillo Osorio and Rowan Geddis (Gasworks coordinator) was recorded in 2011, at MAM-Rio. Watch “PIPA 2011: Awards and residencies in debate”:

Special videos

This series was created in December 2011 and has, as one of its goals, the stimulation of discussion and reflection on different points of art as it happens nowadays.

Always made by Matrioska Films, the series of special videos brings stories related to art, whose themes emerge from video-interviews with the nominated artists, over the course of four years, such as “Inabilsmo”.

The series also addresses themes that come up from conversations between the Prize and Matrioska teams, like in “The bar owner”, “Charles’ cup of tea” and the most recent Interview with Nelson Leirner.

See the full list of Prize videos:access the videos page.

In Conversations: Maryam Jafri & TJ Demos at Gasworks

(London, UK)

On April 15th, at 7pm artist Maryam Jafri will discuss her practice with TJ Demos, critic and Reader in the Department of Art History, University College London.

The event is part of “Mouthfeel”, the first solo exhibition in London by Jafri, comprising the newly commissioned short film of the same name and a new photo-text work entitled “Product Recall: An Index of Innovation”. The exhibition explores the politics underpinning the industrial production of food, connecting themes as diverse as “big food”, flavour enhancement technology and overconsumption. The exhibition continues until 18 May.



T.J. Demos is a critic and Reader in the Department of Art History, University College London. He writes on contemporary art and politics, and is the author, most recently, of The Migrant Image: The Art and Politics of Documentary During Global Crisis (Duke University Press, 2013), and Return to the Postcolony: Spectres of Colonialism in Contemporary Art (Sternberg, 2013). He also recently guest edited a special issue of Third Text (no. 120, 2013) on the subject of “Contemporary Art and the Politics of Ecology,” and is currently at work on a book on the subject for Sternberg Press.

In Conversations: Maryam Jafri & TJ Demos
15th April at 7pm
Free admission

Gasworks
155 Vauxhall Street
London SE11 5RH
info@gasworks.org.uk
Tel: +44 (0)20 7587 5202
Fax: +44 (0)20 7582 0159

In Conversations: Maryam Jafri & TJ Demos at Gasworks

(London, UK)

On April 15th, at 7pm artist Maryam Jafri will discuss her practice with TJ Demos, critic and Reader in the Department of Art History, University College London.

The event is part of “Mouthfeel”, the first solo exhibition in London by Jafri, comprising the newly commissioned short film of the same name and a new photo-text work entitled “Product Recall: An Index of Innovation”. The exhibition explores the politics underpinning the industrial production of food, connecting themes as diverse as “big food”, flavour enhancement technology and overconsumption. The exhibition continues until 18 May.



T.J. Demos is a critic and Reader in the Department of Art History, University College London. He writes on contemporary art and politics, and is the author, most recently, of The Migrant Image: The Art and Politics of Documentary During Global Crisis (Duke University Press, 2013), and Return to the Postcolony: Spectres of Colonialism in Contemporary Art (Sternberg, 2013). He also recently guest edited a special issue of Third Text (no. 120, 2013) on the subject of “Contemporary Art and the Politics of Ecology,” and is currently at work on a book on the subject for Sternberg Press.

In Conversations: Maryam Jafri & TJ Demos
15th April at 7pm
Free admission

Gasworks
155 Vauxhall Street
London SE11 5RH
info@gasworks.org.uk
Tel: +44 (0)20 7587 5202
Fax: +44 (0)20 7582 0159

Tomorrow | Screening and Conversation: Permission to Play

Permission to Play: Screening and conversation at Gasworks

Wednesday – 9 April 2014 - 4pm-6pm

Artist Lucy Steggals presents, at Gasworks, a short video created after the conclusion of Play is Free, a recent project made in collaboration with a group of local residents.

Steggals will also show excerpts from various films that depict different insights or observations on ‘play’, whilst also inviting attendees to join her in a conversation about personal negotiations of play and our understanding of this form of creative activity.

About “Play is Free”

Play is Free was presented from 31 October 2013 to  23 January 2014.

People, place and play/ play is free/ Play is freedom/ Play is not ordinary or real life/ Permission to play/ Adult play/ Creativity and play/ Play as process/ Culture as play/ Play memories/ Play as necessary/ Play as vital/ Play as fun/ Neoteny / Play and happiness…

Artist Lucy Steggals was invited to work with a group of local residents as part of the ongoing “Even Better Together”programming. Using a series of regular meetings over a four-month period Steggals sought to further develop her project exploring notions of play, and her preoccupation in the encounters we do or don’t allow ourselves in being playful.

Conversation often plays an active and vital component to Steggals’ approach. With her preoccupation and delight in a conversational approach in generating research and hearing of personal negotiations of themes pertinent to her interests, Steggals sought participant’s memories and experiences of playing, both past and present. Making, and the act of inviting the group to make kaleidoscopes, spinning tops and miniature swings also allowed a series of playful encounters during each meeting, encouraging a sense of open dialogue.

A third element of the project incorporated Steggals’ use of making short video pieces in response to the discussions at each session. These films were shared with the group each time they met alongside film extracts selected by Steggals to further explore different observations or explorations of the wide ranging theme of play and being playful.

This project continued to expand on Steggals’ research undertaken while on a fellowship placement with Insakartists Trust in Zambia. During her fellowship Steggals sought out instances where making and playing were intimately connected with a series of films showing dice being made, games with stones being played and tree swings being constructed and played with. The parallels with Steggals’ fellowship continued through this continued focus on play with project participants, and by the accidental discovery of a self made swing hanging from Gasworks’ outside stairwell left in place by previous residency artist Francisca Benitez.

 

Events at Gasworks

Gasworks organises a series of activities which are independent from the main programmes. These events, often conceived more spontaneously, contribute to Gasworks’ programmes with a responsive and flexible approach to the organisation’s main areas of interest.

This strand of activity also includes Gasworks’ long-term projects, some of which involve occasional public manifestations and others whose research will be presented at a later stage.

All events are free (unless otherwise stated).
Booking is recommended for some events – to book please email booking@gasworks.org.uk or call 020 7587 5202.

Address
Gasworks
155 Vauxhall Street
London SE11 5RH

Visiting

Opening Times: (during exhibitions only)
Wed-Sun, 12-6pm or by appointment

Easter 2014 opening: We are open as normal Friday 18 & Saturday 19 April but closed Sunday 20 April.

Access: The gallery and Participation space are fully wheelchair accessible.

FREE ADMISSION
Getting here

Map
Please download a PDF of our map or see Google Maps

Nearest stations
Vauxhall: Victoria line and National rail
Oval: Northern line

Bus routes
2, 3, 36, 59, 77, 87, 88, 133, 155, 156, 159, 185, 196, 333, 344, 360, 436

 

Last days | “Late Barbarians”

(London, UK)

Focusing on the notion of corporeal memory, the group exhibition “Late Barbarians”, presented by Gasworks, explores how shifting social codes and cultural values have been embodied in canonical Western European art and architecture.

The exhibition takes its title from an expression by German sociologist Norbert Elias, which suggests that our future descendants may eventually consider us to have lived during an extended medieval period, implying that we share far greater affinities with our Barbarian forefathers than we might like to think (1). Similarly, the works on show question linear interpretations of history, invoking a present that is haunted by the gestures of our ancestors.

Paying particular attention to art historical representations of the body, photographs by Matts Leiderstam propose a queer re-reading of the gestures depicted in Renaissance paintings, whereas Lili Dujourie’s abstract, single-take “dances to camera” attempt to divorce particular habits of the body from their entrenched social connotations. In contrast, a new commission by Sidsel Meineche Hansen entitled HIS HEAD (2013-) comprises a clay sculpture and symposium that together examine the male human head, separate from the body, as a symbol of patriarchy and power.

Other video works in the exhibition explore reflections of the self in historical art and architecture. Juan Downey’s The Looking Glass (1981) decodes the iconography of the mirror in paintings housed in famous European museums and heritage sites, considering them as tokens of an adopted culture. Sharing Downey’s incisive humour, Chris Marker’s Pictures at an Exhibition (2008) presents a virtual exhibition tour in the online world of Second Life that weaves together personal and collective histories in an ad-hoc museum for the digital age.

Late Barbarians is the second exhibition of The Civilising Process, a yearlong programme of exhibitions and events at Gasworks inspired by Elias’s eponymous 1939 book, which looks at the development of the tastes, manners and sensibilities of Western Europeans since the Middle Ages. Between October 2013 and November 2014 Gasworks is working with invited artists, designers, curators and researchers to tackle a wide range of issues raised by this book in an attempt to understand their relevance for contemporary debates and practices. The Civilising Process comprises five exhibitions, a programme of interdisciplinary events, contributions to Gasworks’s online platform Pipeline and a printed publication.

EVENTS

HIS HEAD Symposium
Saturday 8 February, 3 – 6pm

Convened by Sidsel Meineche Hansen with contributions from Niels Henriksen, a PhD candidate at Princeton University, and Thomas Boutoux, a founding member of castillo/corrales in Paris, this symposium will address the divergent connotations of the male human head. Currently developing his thesis on the radical archaeology of Danish artist Asger Jorn (1914-1973), Niels Henriksen’s presentation will focus on the medieval stone carving of “the double head” from Jorn’s personal image archive. Thomas Boutoux, on the other hand, will apply his interests in French political anthropologist Pierre Clastres (1934-1977) and the theory of the “headless leader” to questions surrounding the role of the state in the current production of art in France.

The Thinking Eye Screening & Presentation
Wednesday 26 February, 6.30 – 9pm

A rare screening of videos from Juan Downey’s The Thinking Eye series, including: Information Withheld (1983, 34 min, colour, sound), Shifters (1984, 28:10 min, colour, sound), J.S Bach (1986, 28:25 min, colour, sound) and Hard Times and Culture: Vienna, ‘fin de siecle’ (1990, 34 min, colour, sound). Originally made for public television, these remarkably ambitious and tacitly autobiographical videos show Downey drawing on linguistic, psychoanalytic, art historical and semiotic theory to unravel some of the foundational concepts of Western culture, such as the idea of “the self”.

This work will be introduced and placed in context by writer and curator Julieta González, adjunct curator at the Bronx Museum in New York and senior curator at the Museo Rufino Tamayo, Mexico City, where she curated Juan Downey: A Communications Utopia in 2013.

(1) ‘In reality, we are all late barbarians’ (1989) Interview with Helmut Hetzel. First published as ‘Norbert Elias: im Grunde sind wir alle späte Barbaren’, Die Welt, 11 December 1989. Translated from the German by Edmund Jephcott.

“Late Barbarians”
24 January 2014 – 9 March 2014
Preview: 23 January, 6.30 – 8.30pm
Opening Times (during exhibitions only)
Wed-Sun, 12-6pm or by appointment
Gasworks – 155 Vauxhall Street – London SE11 5RH