Tagged Marcius Galan

Group show presents a panorama of Brazilian contemporary art production

(Phoenix, US) The exhibition “Past/Future/Present: Contemporary Brazilian Art from the Museum of Modern Art” presents one of the many possible constellations of artworks produced in Brazil from the 1990s to the 2010s. The group show starts today, September 1st, at the Phoenix Art Museum and gathers the works of over 50 artists, including 17 PIPA Prize nominees.

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Art in motion: Serralves’ collection displayed at the passengers terminal of the harbour of Leixões

(Matosinho, Portugal) Museu de Arte Contemporânea de Serralves decided to bring art to a rather unexpected place: the “cruzeiros” terminal of the harbour of Leixões. “A coleção de Serralves no porto de Leixões: Passagens” presents, thus, more than 30 pieces from Serralves Collection belonging to 26 artists from all over the world, including PIPA Prize 2012 Winner Marcius Galan.






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Marcius Galan’s installation “Point to Scale” is featured at MASP

(São Paulo, Brazil) Two months went by before “Ponto em escala real” [“Point to Scale”], installation by Marcius Galan especially commissioned for “Avenida Paulista” – open since February this year –, was finally set up at the Museu de Arte de São Paulo (MASP). The work, a black, round circle made in fabric whose diameter measures 50 meters, is the literal representation of a point in a map of 1:1 scale, and is yet to be approved by Conpresp, office of historic preservation of São Paulo.






Last days | “Imaterialidade”, group show with Laura Vinci, Marcius Galan and Paulo Vivacqua

(São Paulo, Brazil) The curators sought “art that assumes visibility beyond what is visible, sensibility beyond physical effects, travelling through and in between bodies; situations in which materiality loses contours and becomes fluid”. Ligia Canongia explains the sensory proposal of the exhibition is the provocation of emptiness, of absence, of intervals, of vapour and air existing between all things, and what surrounds us constantly.






Last days | “Empty House – Casa Vazia”, group show in tribute to Neoconcretism

(New York, US) “Empty House – Casa Vazia” is a sculpture exhibition featuring Adriano Costa, Erika Verzutti, Marcius Galan and Rodrigo Matheus, among classic Brazilian artists such as Amilcar de Castro and Lygia Pape. Challenging the rationalism and universal objectivity of early abstraction, the artists associated with this movement sought a means of expression beyond an object’s immutable formal properties, and embraced a phenomenological, at times participatory, approach in their efforts to expand the vocabulary of sculpture.






Group show evokes the intangible through 22 artworks by 18 artists

(São Paulo, Brazil) Laura Vinci, Marcius Galan and Paulo Vivacqua are among the eight Brazilian artists with works showcased in “Imaterialidade”, which deals with art in two manners of relationships: the issue of “matter” and “non-matter”, where there may be or not a concrete materiality. Adon Peres comments on how visitors will confront these two perceptions: “in the first case, a specific subject-object relationship is formed, although distanced; in the second, specially with installations, the visitor literally dives into the artwork atmosphere.”






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On view | “Imaterialidade”, group show with Laura Vinci, Marcius Galan and Paulo Vivacqua

(São Paulo, Brazil) The curators sought “art that assumes visibility beyond what is visible, sensibility beyond physical effects, travelling through and in between bodies; situations in which materiality loses contours and becomes fluid”. Ligia Canongia explains the sensory proposal of the exhibition is the provocation of emptiness, of absence, of intervals, of vapour and air existing between all things, and what surrounds us constantly.






“Empty House – Casa Vazia”, exhibition paying tribute to Neoconcretism

(New York, US) “Empty House – Casa Vazia” is a sculpture exhibition featuring Adriano Costa, Erika Verzutti, Marcius Galan and Rodrigo Matheus, among classic Brazilian artists such as Amilcar de Castro and Lygia Pape. Challenging the rationalism and universal objectivity of early abstraction, the artists associated with this movement sought a means of expression beyond an object’s immutable formal properties, and embraced a phenomenological, at times participatory, approach in their efforts to expand the vocabulary of sculpture.






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