Watch five video-interviews with this edition’s PIPA Prize nominees

Today, we release another five video-interviews with this edition’s PIPA Prize nominees. Talking inspirations, practices and career paths, the videos – which have been produced since the first edition of the award, in 2010 – have become an important source for documenting the creative process behind some of the most interesting names of Brazilian contemporary art. Produced exclusively for the PIPA Prize websites by Do Rio Filmes, check out below Bruno Cançado, Francisco Magalhães, Ivan Grilo, Paul Setúbal and Virgínia Pinho‘s video interviews.

Bruno Cançado

Having chosen sculpture as his main medium, Bruno Cançado has developed a really a close relationship with his studio. “I need to be in contact with the materials,” he states. ”

From this contact and these experiences, my works come to life.” Born in Belo Horizonte, in the Brazilian Southeast, the artist’s main themes are the landscape, the construction, and living.
See Bruno Cançado’s page to learn more about his career, view images of his works and read critical texts. 


Francisco Magalhães

Here, Francisco Magalhães remembers his path as a visual artist, from the decision to attend Fine Arts School to the beginning of the transformation of his work, originally based in small drawings, to other techniques: “The drawing bled through the paper and spread. What was already set on the paper space gained a larger surface, spreading through floors, ceilings and walls. I no longer had the intimate relationship of drawing, but went inside the drawing. Before the drawing was made with my wrist and arm moving. Now it was a part of the wrist, the arm and the body.”

See Francisco Magalhães’ page to learn more about his career, view images of his works and read critical texts. 

Ivan Grilo

Mixed up stories, as told through oral speech, and unexpected materials are some of the marks of Ivan Grilo‘s work. Nominated for PIPA Prize for the third time in this edition, he confesses that he has been more interested in life than in developing his own oeuvre lately. “Today I’m more interested in life than in the things I create. Maybe this reflects on my work. Reality is almost fictional because what we live is so absurd”, reveals the artist.
See Ivan Grilo’s page to learn more about his career, view images of his works and read critical texts.


Paul Setúbal

A PIPA Prize nominee for the first time this year, Paul Setúbal‘s works are centered on the body. Hence, no wonder that his constant transit between Goiânia, Brasília and São Paulo have had a large impact on his production. “For a while in Brasília, during this crisis situation, we felt an energy in the city that was really important and intense for my work. On the other hand of this process, living in São Paulo, the energy emanated is completely different than the one from other places,” he states.

See Paul Setúbal’s page to learn more about his career, view images of his works and read critical texts.

Virgínia Pinho

Virgínia Pinho has been combining more and more her artistic and academic works lately. Currently studying for her Communication Masters at Universidade Federal do Ceará, she researches images of work in the films of Harun Farocki. The moving image is, incidentally, her preferred means of expression: she has directed many short films, which have been awarded in art fairs such as Arte Pará and Cine Ceará.

See Virgínia Pinho’s page to learn more about his career, view images of his works and read critical texts.



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