Watch videointerviews with PIPA 2023 Participating Artists and visit their pages

In this fourteenth edition of PIPA Prize, there is a total of 73 Participating Artists – of which 61 were nominated for the first time – chosen by the Nominating Committee. As the last two editions, the Prize is focused on a more recent production, being directed to artists who had their first solo or group exhibition no longer than 15 years ago. The Prize’s goal is to be a boost for artists at the beginning of their careers who develop distinguished works.

An important moment of every edition takes place with the creation of pages for each Participating Artist on the Prize’s websites (in English and in Portuguese): all artists participating have their own page, with images of works, texts, videos, information about the trajectory, among other contents. These pages that are being created now, added to the existing ones, constitute a source for research on Brazilian contemporary art, and can be later updated with the submission of more material by the artists, thus always being up to date with the new moments of each one’s production.

In addition to this content, the pages also have a videointerview offered by PIPA and carried out by the Do Rio Filmes production company, a format that allows the artists to present their work to the public in a closer and more personal way. These videos are being gradually added to their pages, as they are finished, and will be announced on the Prize’s platforms as well.

In this post, we present bellow recently created pages and videointerviews with some of the PIPA 2023 Participating Artists:

Bel Falleiros is a Brazilian artist whose practice focuses on understanding how contemporary constructed landscapes (mis)represent the diverse layers of presence that constitute a place and how that affects those who inhabit them.  In Brazil she had her first solo show at CAIXA Cultural São Paulo and first residency at the Sacatar Institute in Bahia (2014).  Since arriving in the U.S., she has worked to create spaces for grounding and connecting people, stories, nature and place, at Pecos National Park, NM (2016), Burnside Farm, Detroit (2017), Santa Fe Art Institute’s Equal Justice Residency – in collaboration with Tewa Women United, NM (2018), Socrates Sculpture Park, NYC (2020), The Border Project, NYC (2021) and Panorama da Arte Brasileira, São Paulo (2022-3).  She was a More Art Engaging Artist Fellow (2021) and an artist-in-residence for the Dia Teens Program (2021-2). She is the founder of the group Manas Americanas (2018-current), a gathering group that connects women and non-binary people from Latin America living in New York and working with issues of culture, immigration and identity. Since 2019, she has been an art educator at Dia:Beacon and Escuelita en Casa, a project for immigrant Latino children living in Queens, NY. Beyond her studio practice, she participates in collaborative projects across the Americas connecting art, education and autonomous thinking.

Visit the artist’s page here.

Video produced by Do Rio Filmes exclusively for PIPA Prize 2023:

Gustavo Caboco, born in Curitiba, Roraima (1989). Wapichana visual artist, he works in the network Paraná-Roraima and in the paths of return to the land. His production with drawing-document, painting, text, embroidery, animation and performance proposes ways to reflect on the displacements of indigenous bodies, the retaking of memory and in autonomous research in museum collections to contribute to the struggle of indigenous peoples.

Visit the artist’s page here.

Video produced by Do Rio Filmes exclusively for PIPA Prize 2023:

My cradle, Brasilia. Land of modernity, abstraction, straight lines and planned curves. Design, architecture and location by numbers. So I grew up navigating these structures in a designed, mathematically coordinated garden city occupied by life, people, plants and animals. Everything that was once planned will always be occupied by life, never stable, always dynamic. This is how I think about my artwork, based on the idea that design will become complex one day. I create technological poetic innovations that temporarily turn into systems that act in the world.

I’ve always believed that technology and culture go hand in hand and that challenging the trajectory of capitalist appropriation of technology is one of the most vital political expressions I could make. Penetrate the heart of the most high-tech and demonstrate the delicacy of structures through organic logic. That’s why I create robotic plants and artificial life and use computing, technology, science and art as sources of inspiration. Nature, for me, is not an external refuge. It is recursive, contingent, logical and complex.

Visit the artist’s page here.

Video produced by Do Rio Filmes exclusively for PIPA Prize 2023:

The Retratistas do Morro collective aims to contribute to the construction of a narrative of the recent history of Brazilian images based on the understanding and recognition of the existence of the movement of photographers who lived and worked in the favelas, recording daily the ways of life of their communities over the years last 50 years.

It operates through a set of actions linked to the fields of image research, historicity, community experiences, preservation of oral and visual memory, conservation of photo archives and digital restoration, proposing reflections on the fundamental changes promoted by these photographs in current models of perception.

Visit the artist’s page here.

Video produced by Do Rio Filmes exclusively for PIPA Prize 2023:

Dear Laura,

You asked me what I do as a job. It’s hard to put into words how I got here: feeling my body touching the bed, the cell phone in my hand, heavy. The pain in the pinky because the cell phone was not made for my hand. These are the conditions that invade my body in this sick place, while I write you. Since I started, everything has been about the body. In particular, the bodily effects that this chronic disorder has on my body. Pain, exhaustion, acceleration, pressure, instability, inertia, invasive thoughts and physical sensations that escape everyday “normality”. Since then, I have been trying ways to set in motion these bodily sensations that our world calls “symptoms.” Invent danced relationships between my body and the things around me. By things, I mean chairs or walls. But also people, plants, objects, words, matter, cameras.

On a more abstract level, this comes from a curiosity about the forces that choreograph our movements and bodies. More specifically: how the camera does it. Let me try to explain… with the spread of the cell phone, the cameras are living so close to us… we could say that they merged with our bodies. We become “bodicameras” even if the device is not in hands. Even turned off: this cell phone I use to write to you transforms me. Either it’s into an active worker and protagonist, producing without stopping. And, if it’s not this, this cell phone becomes a tool for obsolescence. It turns people into obsolete bodies: simply not being, not being fit, not being considered or seen or worthy of being alive.

My approach is based on body and movement, coming from somatic therapy, dance and improvisation. Despite my job being all practical, big questions hover: how to keep dancing in ways that are not so sickening to us, as collective bodies, and to the worlds around us? What dances can we dance to fight the forces that choreograph us?

I love you,

Sofia

Fond’Roy Hospital, Brussels, 05/05/23

Visit the artist’s page here.

Video produced by Do Rio Filmes exclusively for PIPA Prize 2023:

Keep an eye on PIPA Prize’s website and social media to check out each week new pages of the Participating Artists, and to watch their videointerviews.



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